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Phinia Inc. VP sells over $79,000 in company stock By Investing.com

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In a recent transaction on June 7, Robert Boyle, the Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary of Phinia Inc. (NYSE:PHIN), sold 1,827.717 shares of the company’s common stock. The sale was executed at a weighted average price of $43.77 per share, totaling approximately $79,999.

The shares were sold in multiple transactions with prices ranging from $43.770 to $43.780. Following the sale, Boyle’s direct ownership in the company stands at 36,337.283 shares. It’s important to note that of these remaining shares, 31,549 are classified as restricted stock.

Phinia Inc., known for its role in the motor vehicle parts and accessories sector, is a company incorporated in Delaware with its business operations centered in Auburn Hills, Michigan. This recent stock sale by a key executive is part of the ongoing financial disclosures required by company insiders.

Investors often monitor insider transactions as they can provide insights into the executives’ perspectives on the company’s current valuation and future prospects. However, it’s essential to consider that insider sales can occur for various reasons and may not necessarily reflect a negative outlook on the company’s performance.

The details of the transaction were made public through a Form 4 filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which was signed by attorney-in-fact Kelly A. Albin on behalf of Robert Boyle. on

In other recent news, PHINIA Inc. has made notable strides in its financial performance. The company announced a robust Q1 performance, with adjusted sales hitting the $846 million mark, a 1% increase from the previous year’s corresponding period. This was accompanied by an improved adjusted EBITDA of $131 million and a margin of 15.5%. In a significant move, PHINIA issued $525 million in senior secured notes, which were upsized from an initial $425 million due to strong investor demand.

On the dividend front, PHINIA declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.25 per common share, reflecting the company’s financial health and consistent value return to its shareholders. The company also reported a healthy balance sheet with cash reserves of $325 million and net leverage below 1x EBITDA.

These recent developments underline PHINIA’s strategic focus on financial discipline and a positive outlook for the year, as it expects strong earnings and cash generation. The company also plans to exit all transition service and contract manufacturing agreements by the end of the summer, further streamlining its operations.

InvestingPro Insights

Amidst the recent insider trading activity at Phinia Inc., investors and market spectators are closely analyzing the company’s financial health and growth prospects. The sale by Robert Boyle has brought Phinia Inc. under the spotlight, prompting a look at the company’s performance metrics and future expectations.

InvestingPro data reveals a robust financial standing for Phinia Inc., with a market capitalization of approximately $1.96 billion. The company’s price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio stands at 19.06, indicating investor expectations of future earnings growth. Notably, the adjusted P/E ratio for the last twelve months as of Q1 2024 has improved to 11.8, suggesting increased profitability. Furthermore, Phinia’s revenue has seen a steady increase, with a growth of 5.6% in the same period, reflecting the company’s ability to expand its sales in a competitive sector.

From an investment standpoint, two key InvestingPro Tips highlight Phinia Inc.’s promising outlook. First, analysts have recently revised their earnings expectations upwards for the upcoming period, signaling confidence in the company’s potential to outperform. Additionally, the company has demonstrated a strong return over the last three months, with a price total return of 19.28%, which is a testament to its robust market performance.

For investors seeking more in-depth analysis and additional insights, InvestingPro offers a range of tips, including information on Phinia Inc.’s shareholder yield, debt levels, and profitability projections. There are currently 7 additional InvestingPro Tips available that could provide valuable guidance for making informed investment decisions. Interested investors can access these tips by visiting https://www.investing.com/pro/PHIN and can take advantage of a special offer using the coupon code PRONEWS24 to get an additional 10% off a yearly or biyearly Pro and Pro+ subscription.

While insider transactions like Boyle’s sale are a piece of the puzzle, the broader financial data and expert analysis provided by InvestingPro help paint a more comprehensive picture of Phinia Inc.’s market position and future potential.

This article was generated with the support of AI and reviewed by an editor. For more information see our T&C.





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Explainer-What are the Fed’s bank ‘stress tests’ and what’s new this year? By Reuters

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By Pete Schroeder and Michelle Price

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Federal Reserve is due to release the results of its annual bank health checks on Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. ET (2030 GMT). Under the “stress test” exercise, the Fed tests big banks’ balance sheets against a hypothetical scenario of a severe economic downturn, the elements of which change annually.

The results dictate how much capital those banks need to be deemed healthy and how much they can return to shareholders via share buybacks and dividends. This year, big U.S. lenders are once again expected to show they have ample capital to weather any fresh turmoil in the banking sector.

WHY DOES THE FED ‘STRESS TEST’ BANKS?

The Fed established the tests following the 2007-2009 financial crisis as a tool to ensure banks could withstand a similar shock in future. The tests formally began in 2011, and large lenders initially struggled to earn passing grades.

Citigroup, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase & Co, and Goldman Sachs Group (NYSE:), for example, had to adjust their capital plans to address the Fed’s concerns. Deutsche Bank’s U.S. subsidiary failed in 2015, 2016 and 2018.

However, years of practice have made banks more adept at the tests and the Fed also has made the tests more transparent. It ended much of the drama of the tests by scrapping the “pass-fail” model in 2020 and introducing a more nuanced, bank-specific capital regime.

HOW ARE BANKS ASSESSED NOW?

The test assesses whether banks would stay above the required 4.5% minimum capital ratio – which represents the percentage of its capital relative to assets – during the hypothetical downturn. Banks that perform strongly typically stay well above that. The nation’s largest global banks also must hold an additional “G-SIB surcharge” of at least 1%.

How well a bank performs on the test also dictates the size of its “stress capital buffer,” an additional layer of capital introduced in 2020 which sits on top of the 4.5% minimum.

That extra cushion is determined by each bank’s hypothetical losses. The larger the losses, the larger the buffer.

THE ROLL OUT

The Fed will release the results after markets close. It typically publishes aggregate industry losses, and individual bank losses including details on how specific portfolios – like credit cards or mortgages – fared.

The central bank typically does not allow banks to announce their plans for dividends and buybacks until a few days after the results. It announces the size of each bank’s stress capital buffer in the subsequent months.

The performance of the country’s largest lenders, particularly JPMorgan, Citigroup, Wells Fargo & Co, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley, are closely watched by the markets.

TEST IN LINE WITH 2023

The Fed changes the scenarios each year. They take months to devise and test a snapshot of banks’ balance sheets at the end of the previous year. That means they risk becoming outdated.

In 2020, for example, the real economic crash caused by the COVID-19 pandemic was by many measures more severe than the Fed’s scenario that year.

After the failures of mid-size lenders Silicon Valley Bank, Signature Bank (OTC:) and First Republic last year, the Fed was criticized for not having tested bank balance sheets against a rising interest rate environment, and instead assuming rates would fall amid a severe recession.

This year’s test is broadly in line with the 2023 test, with the hypothetical unemployment rate under a “severely adverse” scenario rising 6.3 percentage points compared with 6.4 last year.

STRESSES IN COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

The exam also envisages a 40% slump in the prices of commercial real estate, an area of concern over the past two years as lingering pandemic-era office vacancies and higher for longer interest rates stress borrowers.

In addition, banks with large trading operations will be tested against a “global market shock,” and some will also be tested against the failure of their largest counterparty.

For the second time, the Fed is also conducting “exploratory” shocks to banks. This year’s test also includes additional exploratory economic and market shocks which won’t help set capital requirements, but will help the Fed gauge whether it should broaden the test in the future. The market shocks will apply to the largest banks, while all 32 will be tested on the economic shocks.

Fed Vice Chair for Supervision Michael Barr has said multiple scenarios could make the tests better at detecting banks’ weaknesses.

WHICH BANKS ARE TESTED?

In 2024, 32 banks will be tested. That’s up from 23 last year, as the Fed decided in 2019 to allow banks with between $100 billion and $250 billion in assets to be tested every other year.

These are the banks being tested in 2024:

Ally Financial (NYSE:)

American Express (NYSE:)

Bank of America Corporation (NYSE:)

The Bank of New York Mellon (NYSE:) Corporation

Barclays US LLC

BMO Financial Corp.

Capital One Financial Corporation (NYSE:)

The Charles Schwab Corporation (NYSE:)

Citigroup

Citizens Financial (NYSE:) Group, Inc.

Credit Suisse Holdings (USA)

DB USA Corporation

Discover Financial Services (NYSE:)

Fifth Third Bancorp (NASDAQ:)

Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

HSBC North America Holdings

Huntington Bancshares (NASDAQ:)

JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE:)

Keycorp

M&T Bank Corporation (NYSE:)

Morgan Stanley

Northern Trust Corporation (NASDAQ:)

The PNC Financial (NYSE:) Services

RBC US Group Holdings LLC

Regions Financial Corporation (NYSE:)

Santander (BME:) Holdings USA

State Street Corporation (NYSE:)

TD Group US Holdings LLC

Truist Financial (NYSE:) Corporation

UBS Americas Holding LLC

© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: An eagle tops the U.S. Federal Reserve building's facade in Washington, July 31, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

U.S. Bancorp

Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:)





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Shadow health secretary ‘disgusted’ by treatment of junior doctors

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Changing the NHS’s funding model and introducing an insurance system for dentistry in the UK would be a “dangerous slippery slope”, Labour has said.

Speaking on the BBC’s Today programme, shadow health secretary Wes Streeting said the issues facing the NHS were not down to the funding model, but were due to “where the money goes.”

Labour has promised to create 700,000 extra dental appointments per year if elected, to manage the backlog of patients requiring treatment. 

Streeting said if Labour were to win the election, he would “get the British Dental Association in” to start the process of reforming NHS dentistry. 

“We’ve got to deal with the crisis that is staring us in the face.”



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The best time of day to exercise, according to science

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Claire Zulkey, a 44-year-old Chicago-area freelance writer, has a well-established morning routine: She gets her kids off to school, turns the television to a favorite show, and gets moving with a full-body workout. Once completed, Zulkey showers and settles in to work.

Meghan Cully, in contrast, puts in a full day’s work before hitting the gym on her way home. The 32-year-old graphic designer from Maryland is a self-described “slow starter” in the mornings and finds it difficult to get moving early in the day.

Each gets their workout, but is one time of day better than the other? 

Consider your fitness goals 

A small study out of Skidmore College examined the benefits of morning versus evening exercise for both women and men. Paul J. Arciero, Ph.D., professor for health and human physiological sciences department at Skidmore, was the lead investigator. 

“We had the groups follow the same multi-modal routine, randomly dividing them into evening and morning groups,” he says. “We found women and men respond differently to different types of exercise depending on the time of day, which surprised us.”

The study revealed that for women who want to lower blood pressure or reduce belly fat, morning exercise works best. Those women striving for upper body muscle gains, endurance, or overall mood improvement should consider evening workouts.

For the male participants, the findings were somewhat flipped: Evening exercise lowers blood pressure, the risk of heart disease, and feelings of fatigue, while similar to women, they burn more fat with morning exercise. To understand the reasons behind the results, additional research is required.

What might be most ideal, then, says Arciero, is adjusting your workouts to the time of day when you can get the most bang for your buck. “If you’re a female, then, you might want to perform your cardio workouts in the morning, and your strength training in the evening,” he says.

Early birds versus night owls

“For many people, [the best time to exercise] will depend on their chronotype,” says Jennifer J. Heisz, Ph.D., associate professor of kinesiology at McMaster University and author of Move the Body, Heal the Mind.

Chronotype is your body’s natural inclination to sleep at a certain time—it’s what determines whether you’re a night owl or an early bird. For the 25% of the population that considers themselves a night owl, getting both enough sleep and enough exercise can be difficult, says Heisz. 

“Exercising at night can sometimes be challenging with societal norms,” she explains. “You might naturally stay up until midnight and exercise late at night, but if you have to be out the door the next morning at 7, you’re not getting enough sleep.”

Sleep–which provides your body the necessary time to recover and make gains from exercise–should always be a priority when it comes to exercise. Regardless of research on the benefits of certain exercises at particular times of the day, your results will be diminished if it doesn’t allow enough time for sleep.

How to shift your workout time

If your goal is to change up your routine to adhere to Arciero’s findings related to exercise time of day, or simply to make exercise more convenient even if it runs against your chronotype, Heisz says it’s possible. 

“If you’d like to shift to a morning routine, for instance, the good news is that both the sun and exercise can reset your biological cues,” she says. “Put them together by exercising outside in the sunshine, and it’s a powerful effect.”

For older adults, whose tendency is to sometimes awaken too early and not fall back to sleep, the desired shift might be to evening exercise. “This might help with falling asleep later and staying asleep longer,” says Heisz.

If you’re worried that evening workouts will impact your ability to fall asleep, shift your workouts to gentler forms of exercise, like yoga. Avoid vigorous exercise like running, which might elevate your heart rate and make it tougher to wind down. 

For evening exerciser Cully, the trick is working out on the way home from work, which is spaced far enough from bedtime not to impact her sleep. “If I went home first, I probably wouldn’t exercise,” she admits. “But then I have my whole evening to wind down.”

No matter when you prefer to exercise, what’s most important, according to Arciero, is including a multi-modal approach. For his study, Arciero developed a program that does just that, called RISE—resistance training, sprint interval training, stretching, and endurance. “We found that when doing each type of exercise once a week, compliance was higher and so was the benefit,” he explains. 

More on workouts and exercise:



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