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History of Cameroon

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Beginning on July 5, 1884, all of present-day Cameroon and parts of several of its neighbours became a German colony, Kamerun, with a capital first at Buea and later at Yaoundé.

The Imperial German government made substantial investments in the infrastructure of Cameroon, including the extensive railways, such as the 160-metre single-span railway bridge on the South Sanaga River branch. Hospitals were opened all over the colony, including two major hospitals at Douala, one of which specialised in tropical diseases (the Germans had discovered the 1912, wrote in an official report in 1919 that the population of Kamerun had increased significantly. However, the indigenous peoples proved reluctant to work on these projects, so the Germans instigated a harsh and unpopular system of forced labour.[2] In fact, Jesko von Puttkamer was relieved of duty as governor of the colony due to his untoward actions toward the native Cameroonians.[3] In 1911 at the Treaty of Fez after the Agadir Crisis, France ceded a nearly 300,000 km² portion of the territory of French Equatorial Africa to Kamerun which became Neukamerun, while Germany ceded a smaller area in the north in present-day Chad to France.

In World War I, the British invaded Cameroon from Nigeria in 1914 in the Kamerun campaign, with the last German fort in the country surrendering in February 1916. After the war, this colony was partitioned between the United Kingdom and France under a June 28, 1919 League of Nations mandates (Class B). France gained the larger geographical share, transferred Neukamerun back to neighboring French colonies, and ruled the rest from Yaoundé as Cameroun (French Cameroons). Britain’s territory, a strip bordering Nigeria from the sea to Lake Chad, with an equal population was ruled from Lagos as Cameroons (British Cameroons). German administrators were allowed to once again run the plantations of the southwestern coastal area. A British Parliamentary Publication, Report on the British Sphere of the Cameroons (May 1922, p. 62-8), reports that the German plantations there were “as a whole . . . wonderful examples of industry, based on solid scientific knowledge. The natives have been taught discipline and have come to realise what can be achieved by industry. Large numbers who return to their villages take up cocoa or other cultivation on their own account, thus increasing the general prosperity of the country.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. @MAOTSETUNGTSOYIAMBASSA-bw1ej

    March 4, 2018 at 7:29 pm

    Faire du séparatisme un remède souverain pour les problèmes du Cameroun cela s'appelle du banditisme politique et du brigandisme politique.
    Le séparatisme comme option politique et comme process de résolution des problèmes d'un pays; cela s'appelle une pure imposture. Cameroon anglophone; Cameroun francophone sont des démembrements administratifs du Kamerun. "L'Ambazonie" peut exister; mais pas sur un seul centimètre du territoire du Kamerun – Cameroun – Cameroon.

  2. @ndonuetakwi3463

    March 27, 2018 at 8:30 am

    i love your video vive Bamenda Cameroon

  3. @florabotelho6845

    November 22, 2021 at 12:29 pm

    what is this? German colonial pride?!

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